Kingswood Extended - Correspondence Courses

Kingswood Extended offers two non-credit course options for those looking to prepare for effective ministry in the local church: Correspondence Courses and Flame Courses. In addition to being open to any individual in pursuit of Christian higher education, these courses also meet the academic requirements for licensing and credentialing in The Wesleyan Church through the Division of Education and Clergy Development.

Correspondence Courses allow individuals to complete courses at an independent pace with a flexible schedule that accommodates the unique demands of life.

Flame Courses use technology to bring together the convenience of online education with the benefits of live classroom interaction. Please click here for more information on Flame Courses through Kingswood Extended.

Both Correspondence Courses and Flame Courses are non-credit options, i.e. they cannot be applied to a degree program. Please click here for more information on undergraduate and graduate courses offered for credit through Kingswood University.

Correspondence Courses have been designed as an opportunity for adult ministerial students, lay ministers, and volunteers to prepare for effective ministry in the local church. Choosing from a selection of twenty-seven courses, all of which meet the academic requirements for ordination in The Wesleyan Church, adult students will be engaged in rigorous academic studies and practical ministry education. Because students work at their own pace and set their own schedule, Correspondence Courses are perfect for those times in life when flexibility is key and extended timelines are more manageable.

Correspondence Courses are independent study courses, requiring the student to plan and execute their own strategy for completion within the course time frame.

Students will work with an instructor to successfully complete all required readings, assignments, papers, and exams by the course closing date. Instructors will be available by phone and by email to answer questions and offer any assistance necessary during the course.

Upon registration, students will receive the course start date, selected syllabus, access to the learning environment, and the course closing date.

Course Start and End Dates

Course Dates Defined:

  • Registration Date - online registration form is completed and payment has been made
  • Start Date - three weeks from the registration date
  • End Date - thirteen weeks from the start date; sixteen weeks from the registration date

Correspondence courses will start three weeks from the date of registration. This three-week grace period will allow for the order and arrival of required course texts and materials before the course begins. Students may begin work on their course as soon as their course texts arrive. However, assignment submissions will not be received until the official course start date, and instructors are under no obligation to be available for questions relating to the course material and/or assignments before the course start date.

Course end date is calculated thirteen weeks (ninety-one days) from the course start date.

Submitting Course Work

Courses must be completed within thirteen weeks (ninety-one days) of the start date.

An extension of up to one month may be granted for extenuating circumstances, prior to the final due date, at the discretion of the Director of Kingswood Extended. Courses not completed within the allotted time will be forfeited; a final grade will not be assigned.

Instructors will submit grades to Kingswood Extended within two weeks of the close of the course. Students will be notified when final grades have been received.

Grading

Students will receive a numerical final grade. A final grade of 76% or above is required to fulfill the academic requirements for credentialing in The Wesleyan Church. Syllabi will include the evaluation guidelines for assessing submitted work.

Plagiarism & Other Academic Dishonesty

Correspondence Courses follow the plagiarism and academic dishonesty guidelines established by Kingswood University. For more information, please consult the policies outlined in the Kingswood Catalogue

Fees

All fees are listed in Canadian funds. Payment must be made in full at the time of registration.

Correspondence courses are $245 Canadian, plus books and materials.

Refund Policy

Refunds for course fees are calculated on the following basis:

  • 100% within fourteen days of the start date.
  • No refund after fourteen days.

A self-advising form for those pursuing credentialing in The Wesleyan Church is available HERE to assist you in making decisions as you register for courses.  Others may find this helpful, as well, as a guide for course sequence and progression.

Once you register, you will receive your syllabus and start date with a three-week grace period to order and receive any required books or materials. Students are free to purchase course texts from their preferred source.

Expand the course title to see the detailed description.

This course is an introduction to hermeneutics, the art of biblical interpretation, through the study of the principles of induction, the development of skills, and the use of various reference tools which are applied to specific books of the Bible.

This course consists of four units. The first three units involve readings from the course text, an essay, and workbook assignments. The fourth unit is a project involving the application of the methods learned to the study of Third John.

This course will enable the student to gain a clearer understanding of the Old Testament as a whole, as well as its parts. Students will gain factual knowledge that can be passed along so that all can better know the God of the Old Testament and share His good news with others. The student will gain knowledge about the structure, content, history, and geography of the Old Testament.

This course consists of four units involving reading of the course text and selected OT chapters/passages, completion of workbook assignments, plus additional assignments, including maps, timelines, response to readings, etc. There is no final exam.

This course will enable the student to gain a clearer understanding of the New Testament as a whole, as well as its parts. Students will gain factual knowledge that can be passed so that all can better know the Jesus of the New Testament and share His good news with others. The student will gain knowledge about the structure, content, history, and geography of the New Testament.

This course consists of four units involving reading of the course text and selected NT chapters/passages, completion of workbook assignments, plus additional assignments, including maps, timelines, response to readings, etc. There is no final exam.

The field of Christian doctrine will be studied in this course. The course surveys the general field of theology and is a study in basic beliefs and why we believe as we do. Later courses will go into more detail on various doctrine.

This course consists of 13 topical lessons based on selected readings from the Bible, course texts, and references to The Wesleyan Discipline. The professor suggests that 6-8 hours be spent on each of the 13 lessons, consisting of reading assignments and 10-20 essay questions. The completed lessons are to be sent to the instructor in groups of three. This course has no final exam.

Note: This course is a pre-requisite to Expository Preaching.

This course provides a combination of theory and practice in the preparation and delivery of sermons. Analysis of sample sermons will occur with suggestions for finding and filing sermon resource material.

The course consists of 4 “Workshops” based on the readings from the course texts. The assignments include analyzing sermons, interviewing pastors regarding various aspects of the preaching ministry, and preparing a sermon with a written manuscript (and audience evaluations). There are no exams. The grade will be determined by the quality of work done in the course.

This course is an introduction to the Discipline and a survey of the historical development of The Wesleyan Church. The student will be introduced to the doctrines, standards, practices and procedures that govern the church and the theological, historical, and sociological factors which have shaped the development of the denomination.

The course consists of four units with lessons based on readings from the course text and The Wesleyan Discipline. Units One and Two focus on the history of the Wesleyan Church; Units Three and Four focus on The Discipline of The Wesleyan Church. Each unit is to be completed in order, according to the instructions, and mailed to the instructor. There is no final exam for this course.

This course will introduce the student to basic principles of church leadership, church management, and parliamentary law. Through reading, observation, and reflection, the student will be prepared spiritually and practically to provide leadership in a local church.

The course consists of four Units: The Soul of the Leader, Developing a Leadership Mindset, Leading and Managing for Growth, and Roberts’ Rules of Order. The first three units require course text reading assignments, reflection/response submissions, and practical projects. The final unit requires preparation for an online test on Roberts Rules of Order.

This course is designed to introduce the educational ministry of the church. Special attention will be given to four broad topics: biblical, theological, and philosophical foundations; aspects of the teaching/learning process; the needs, abilities, and special considerations of teaching various groups of people; and the organization and design of the Christian education ministries of the local church.

This course is divided into three units of material (Principles, Planning, Practice) and a Final Project. Each unit requires reading several chapters from the course text, completing a series of questions relating to the chapters, and additional assignments. At the end of the course, a final project, chosen from a list of options, will be required in place of an examination.

This course is designed for the personal and spiritual growth of the minister. It explores the biblical and historical foundations of the spiritual life, as well as methodologies and resources for developing Christian spirituality in the lives of others in cooperation with the work of the Holy Spirit. This course will enhance the student's ability to see the relationship between spirituality and ministry, discover principles for the enrichment of their own spirituality, and help Christian disciples grow in their relationship with Christ.

The course is divided into three units. Each unit requires a written paper to demonstrate understanding of the assigned material. Unit materials may be submitted at the same time, once all work is completed. Journals will be returned to the students if requested. This class will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis (P or F).

This course introduces the basic principles and issues in the field of sociology – the study of human interaction. It will help students see the need for critical thinking about the social world, gain familiarity with basic sociological concepts, confront social change, plan for the future, and clarify their own values so they can appreciate how Christian faith is transmitted through human interaction.

This course consists of 17 lessons divided into three units. Each lesson consists of a series of questions based on the readings from the course text and supplementary materials provided in the syllabus. When all lessons in a unit are completed, they are to be submitted to the instructor. Upon completion of the lesson from all three units, another study guide for the final exam will be sent to the student to help identify key concepts and issues. The exam will cover materials in the text, supplementary materials, and lesson questions. The exam is to be taken under the supervision of a Wesleyan ordained minister (not a relative) in your area.

 

This course is a study of the subject matter and methods of psychology as a science. The student will study human development and the physiological basis for behaviour, personality, learning, sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, adjustment for mental health, abnormal behaviour, and social psychology. Such a study will provide the basis for a better understanding of one's own behaviour and that of others.

This course consists of 24 lessons divided into three units. Lessons 1-23 are based on the readings from the course text and the Bible; Lesson 24 is a review guide which must be created for the final exam. The lessons are to be sent to the instructor according to the prescribed schedule. A practice test will be given at the end of each unit. These will be sent directly to the student and they will serve as a preparation for the final comprehensive examination. The final exam is to be taken under the supervision of a Wesleyan ordained minister (not a relative) in your area.

Note: (Required only for those on the previous [pre-2004] set of ordination requirements; replaced by Evangelism/Church Health & Global and Intercultural Ministries). 

This course provides an overview of the outreach mission of the church, both locally and globally, stressing biblical/theological foundations and contemporary practical issues.

The course is divided into four parts: Introduction; Biblical Grounds; Evangelism; and Missions. Instructions for assignments are found in each segment and include a combination of readings, questions, and papers. Assignments are to be submitted at the end of each part. There is no final exam.

This course is designed to provide a framework to assist in the philosophy of making an ethical decision and will provide insight into various thought processes and how segments of society arrive at their values. The course will help solidify what you believe and help you to express and defend your beliefs.

The course consists of three units. The entire course text is to be read and discussion questions for assigned chapters will be submitted to the professor at the end of each unit. There are also two papers to be written.

A special study of the first five books of the Bible, this course will give students insight into God’s dealings with primitive people and how these books are definitive for the rest of Scripture. Emphasis will be placed on the books of Genesis and Exodus.

This course consists of 16 lessons based on selected readings from the Bible and course text. The lessons are divided into three categories (Genesis; Exodus; and Leviticus/Deuteronomy) with 2-4 essay questions per lesson. Material for each of the categories should be submitted to the professor upon completion. When all lessons are completed and there has been significant time for study, a closed-book final exam is to be taken under the supervision of a Wesleyan ordained minister (not a relative) in your area.

The purpose of this course is to study the books of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Canticles (Song of Solomon); to note the comparable literature of the surrounding cultures; to study the form and function of Hebrew poetry; to develop skills in the interpretation and utilization of poetic literature; and to study the characteristics of wisdom literature, noting its contribution to the Old Testament.

This course consists of 24 lessons (with 2-4 essay questions per lesson) based on selected readings from the Bible and the course text. Additional collateral reading is expected and proper bibliographical information should be provided with each lesson. The completed lessons are to be sent to the instructor in groups of six. Upon completion of the lessons, a final exam is to be taken under the supervision of a Wesleyan ordained minister (not a relative) in your area. The exam will be based on the material studied by way of biblical books and the course text.

The student will be given an insight into the message of two of the biblical prophets, Jeremiah and Amos. The study will provide guidelines and ideas in approaching the prophets both for personal study and for preaching.

This course consists of 24 lessons with questions based on the readings from the books of Jeremiah and Amos. Of the 24 lessons (2-5 essay questions each), 20 deal with Jeremiah and are the only lessons to be submitted, in groups of five, to the instructor. Upon completion of the lessons, a final exam, covering the questions on the syllabus, is to be taken under the supervision of a Wesleyan ordained minister (not a relative) in your area.

The study of the New Testament Church as found in the book of Acts relates to the redemptive ministry of Christ and His selection and training of disciples who were to become the apostles of the New Testament Church. The study will include the divine origin, purpose and plan for the church, the relationship of Christ, the Holy Spirit and the apostles in the Church’s growth, the composition and character of the Church, the reasons for its success in a pagan world, and its relevance to the Christian Church today.

This course consists of 13 lessons based on readings from the book of Acts and the course texts. Lessons involve reading Acts in two translations and answering questions that cover the book as a whole (overview) and specific sections/chapters. The student is required to list (people, events, etc.), summarize, and analyze. There is no final exam. The completed lessons are to be sent to the instructor in groups of three.

The purpose of this course is to give the student a clear understanding of the message of the Epistle to the Romans, as well as to provide experience in techniques of the inductive study of the New Testament books.

This course consists of 16 lessons based on readings from the book of Romans and the course text. The completed lessons are to be sent to the instructor according to the prescribed schedule. Upon completion of all lessons (graded/feedback provided to the student), the student will complete the final project: 6 concurrent Bible Studies covering Romans chapters 7 and 8. This course has no final exam.

This course will give the student a clear understanding of the message and life of Jesus Christ, as well as provide experience in the discipline of engaging in practical theology that leads to ongoing Bible study and lesson preparation.

This course consists of six lessons based on the readings from the Gospels of the New Testament. The completed lessons are to be sent to the instructor according to the prescribed schedule. Upon completion of all lessons (graded/feedback provided to the student) the student should complete the final project: a seven-week sermon series or Bible study series covering the “I AM” statements of Jesus Christ in the Gospel of John. This course has no final exam.

This is a general survey of the Christian church from the New Testament to the present and deals with important persons, movements, and doctrinal developments. The study helps to understand the Christian Church in America and in the world today. It will help the student to understand the beliefs and the denominational expressions of modern Christianity.

This course consists of 24 lessons based on the readings from the course text. The completed lessons are to be sent to the instructor in groups of three or more. Lesson 24 is a conclusion requiring an essay on the theme “The Wesleyan Church: Its Problems and Prospects in the Light of Church History.” When all the lessons are completed and submitted to the instructor, a final examination, drawn from the lesson questions and including several essays on broad themes or movements in church history, will be required. The final exam is to be taken under the supervision of a Wesleyan minister (not a relative) in your area.

The purpose of this course is to ignite a passion to share Christ’s love with others. Through a series of Units, the student will actively engage in personal evangelism work under the leading of the Holy Spirit. There will also be guided, purposeful reflection on evangelism techniques and methodologies, church health, and church planting.

This course consists of 10 Units. Some units require reading course texts or various internet resources and a response/reflection paper. Some units are practical projects/assignments that will provide experience or insight into evangelism, church planting, etc. There are no exams.

This course provides an overview of the history, theology, and practice of cross-cultural mission theory, including local church involvement in cross-cultural ministry.

The course consists of three Units: Theology of Mission, History of Mission, and Practice of Mission. Each unit requires course text reading assignments with written summaries of chapters read and either a research paper (Units 1 & 2) or exercises and two reports (Unit 3). There are no exams.

This course builds on what was learned in Introduction to Theology and digs deeper into theology from a Wesleyan perspective. This course will give the student a better grasp of Wesleyan theology intellectually, better know the God our theology describes, and better serve Him and His people. Objectives of the class are: 1. To gain a deeper understanding of God, the world He made, humanity, sin, and redemption. 2. To expand the student’s skills of thinking about and applying theological truth. 3. To equip the student to proclaim and live the truth.

The course consists of 15 lessons based on the readings from the course text. The assignments are to be sent to the instructor at prescribed intervals. There is no final exam.

The course will include a study of the biblical, theological, historical, and contemporary elements of Christian worship, such as Scripture, music, sacraments, liturgy, prayer, and the ministry of the Word. Students will have a chance to evaluate their own personal worship. This course will enhance the student's ability to plan, participate in, and lead acts of public worship.

Worship is a four-unit course, requiring readings from the course text, writing assignments, reflection papers, and practical projects. Also required are interviews with pastors and several meetings with a Worship Reflection Group made up of 3 lay persons (plus your pastor, if possible) from different age groups.

Note: Introduction to Homiletics is a pre-requisite for this course.

This course provides tools and techniques for biblically-based preaching and provides practice in preparing various types of expository sermons from select scripture passages.

The course consists of three units of responding to textbook reading assignments, interviewing preachers, analyzing sermons, etc., and one unit of preparation, writing and delivery of an expository sermon from selected scripture passages. There will be critiques by the instructor and members of a listening audience.

The objective of this study is to acquaint the student with various approaches to pastoral problems and the duties of a pastor in assisting persons in need. The student will gain an understanding of ministry appropriate to proper pastoral care. It will include the work of the pastor from both a psychological and theological frame of reference.

The course consists of four units, each based upon a separate course text. Unit One requires the discussion of the course text in the form of a letter to the author that is sent to the professor (not the author). Units Two-Four involve a series of response questions. Unit Three also requires a scenario to be role-played, recorded, and sent to the professor. There is a proctored final exam.

This course will provide a survey of the tasks which accompany pastoral ministry in a local church setting. Emphasis will be placed on pastors as persons as well as the competencies needed for contemporary ministry.

The course is divided into five units with lessons and projects based on the readings from the course texts. There is also suggested collateral reading with each unit. Assignments are to be completed and sent to the instructor as a unit. The final project is a 5-page paper in which the student develops a personal philosophy of ministry. There is no final exam.

This course will provide the student with a better intellectual understanding of the Wesleyan doctrine of holiness, for their own benefit and for those they minister among. It is the hope that, as students gain in understanding, God will continue to work in them, drawer them closer and equipping them for more powerful service.

The course has 13 lessons consisting of readings from the course texts, 4-9 questions reflecting/responding to those readings, and some additional assignments. This course has no final exam.

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For more information, please contact Andrea: 

guntera@kingswood.edu  
506) 432-4459 (Office) 
(506) 567-0743 (Cell)

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